Be aware of mental health care needs 24/7

As Mental Health Month comes to an end the work to improve our mental health and overall well being continues.

Unfortunately, stigma, shame, misinformation and misunderstanding surrounding mental health still exist. It stops people for getting help. It affects how we see people who have mental illness. And it limits how we talk about mental illness and wellness, further isolating people with the disease.

Here are some programs and ideas to help you better understand mental illness. Take a look and share with your friends.

Hilarious World of Depression. This podcast is about depression. And laughs. From its website: Depression is an incredibly common and isolating disease experienced by millions, yet often stigmatized by society. The Hilarious World of Depression is a series of frank, moving, and, yes, funny conversations with top comedians who have dealt with this disease, hosted by veteran humorist and public radio host John Moe. If you have not met the disease personally, it’s almost certain that someone you know has, whether it’s a friend, family member, colleague, or neighbor. Depression is a vicious cycle of solitude and stigma that leaves people miserable and sometimes dead. Frankly, we’re not going to put up with that anymore.

 

Make It OK. This campaign increases public awareness of helpful mental health care by helping people to talk more openly about mental health.

The 45-minute Make It OK presentation provides helpful, simple tips for talking friends and family members. In addition to taking the pledge, you can learn more about reducing stigma.

 

Mental Health First Aid© (MHFA.) This in-person training for youth and adults teaches how to assist people who are in crisis or are at risk of developing a mental illness. This eight-hour course teaches how to identify signs of addiction and mental illness, and how to evaluate the situation and provide help.

MHFA also gives people who take the course connections to local professionals who can help

 

Psychological First Aid (PFA.) Take the course used by first-responders and others to help children and adults experiencing immediate mental trauma. This trauma can come from violence, public health emergency, disaster or other event.

PFA is sponsored by the Minnesota Department of Health Office of Emergency Preparedness. You can take the course as a six-hour interactive online course or use the online manual.

 

Question, Persuade, Refer (QPR.)  These three simple steps  can help prevent suicide. Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich Maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis. QHR also teaches you how to question, persuade and refer someone to help.

Learn QPR in an hour at QPR’s website.